Warm-Weather Cat Safety

Spring and summer are a time to relax for you and kitty. Keep your feline companion safe by staying educated on the dangers of the following:

Lillies

As spring approaches, lilies will become more common in households as potted plants, or in bouquets. Unfortunately, several types of lilies can be deadly to cats. Easter lily, tiger lily, rubrum, Japanese show lily, some species of daylily, and certain other members of the Liliaceae family can cause kidney failure in cats. Within only a few hours of ingestion of the plant material, the cat may vomit, become lethargic, or develop a lack of appetite. These signs continue and worsen as kidney damage progresses. Without prompt and proper treatment by a veterinarian, the cat will develop kidney failure in approximately 36-72 hours. All parts of these lilies are considered toxic to cats and consuming even small amounts can cause severe poisoning. If there is a lily in your home, there is always the chance that your cat could be accidentally exposed. See our list of safe plants for cats.

Open windows

As the weather warms, many will open windows in their home. Do not open windows without screens. Cats do not always land on their feet, and a steep fall can be fatal. 

Fleas

Multi-pet households need to know that cats can get fleas from dogs since dogs get walked outside and are more prone to catching them. Swift and minuscule, a flea can also jump off human clothes and latch onto your pet for months. With one flea producing about fifty eggs a day, the population multiplies quickly, spilling into the surrounding environment. Aside from causing irritation, fleas may also transmit fatal bacterial diseases, such as plague. Consult with your vet for the best flea treatment. Some flea collars can cause seizures and be life threatening to your cat. Never use a flea treatment for your cat that is recommended for dogs.

Ticks

In the warmer months, ticks can be a big problem for cats, especially in suburban areas. Ticks come from deer and jump on cats’ ears or perineum—the area around the anus where there’s no hair. Slower-moving and larger in size, ticks attach themselves to cats and feed off their blood, spreading serious illnesses, like Cytauxzoonosis or Lyme disease.

Allergies

Cats can develop allergies to air particles just as humans do. Allergens include pollen, grass, weeds, and even flea saliva. Cats sensitive to these irritants may itch and scratch severely, possibly causing hair loss and open sores that could lead to a bacterial infection.

Lawn and Garden Chemicals

If fertilizing your lawn, or using weed control chemicals, keep all pets off the lawn for at least 48 hours. These chemicals can be toxic and even fatal to your pets.

Antifreeze

Very small amounts of this pleasant-tasting substance can be lethal. As little as one teaspoon of antifreeze can be deadly to a cat. Thoroughly clean up any spills and store antifreeze in tightly closed containers. Automotive products such as gasoline, oil, and antifreeze should be stored in areas that are inaccessible to your pets. Propylene glycol is a safer form of antifreeze. Low Toxª brand antifreeze contains propylene glycol and is recommended to use in pet households. If you think your pet has consumed antifreeze, contact your veterinarian immediately!pets.

Potpourris

Pets are often exposed to liquid potpourri by direct ingestion from simmer pots or spills, or by rubbing against leaky bottles or simmer pots containing the potpourri, or from spilling the containers upon themselves. Oral exposure can result following grooming. Exposure of pets to some types of liquid potpourris can result in severe oral, dermal, and ocular damage.

Summer Heat

Heat prostration kills many pet cats each year. If your cat spends a lot of time outdoors, make sure that you provide a cool and shady spot with clean water for them to drink. Do not leave your pet in a car with the windows up since this can cause death in as little as ten minutes.

Swimming Pools

If possible, try to prohibit access to your pool, or cover it with a tight fitting cover that prevents access.

safe plants for cats

 

Achillea
African violet
Alyssum
Aster
Basil
Bean sprouts
Begonia
Buddleia
Calendula
Catmint
Catnip
Celosia
Chamomile
Chervil
Chives
Cleome
Coleus
Columbine
Coneflower
Coriander
Cosmos
Cress
Dahlia
Dianthus

 

Dill

Dorotheanthus

Forget-me-not

Heliotrope

Hollyhock

Hyssop

Impatiens

Jade

Lavender
Lemon balm
Lemon verbena
Lettuce
Lovage
Marum
Miniature Rose
Mint
Monarda
Nasturtium
Oat grass
Orchid
Oregano
Pansy
Parsley
Pea (not sweetpea)

 

Peppermint

Petunia

Phlox

Portulaca

Rose

Rosemary

Sage
Scabiosa
Shasta
Daisy
Snapdragon
Spearmint
Spinach
Strawflower
Succulents
Sunflower
Tarragon
Thyme
Torenia
Verbascum
Violet
Wheat (not wheat grass)
Zinnia

CONTACT US

(513) 771-2967

P.O. Box 46624 

Cincinnati, OH 45246

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